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Death and Ephemeral Nature of Life

The Circus is on with the music on full blare, bright colors running riots in front of eyes. A huge merry-go-round comes to still and people on the lowest car are getting down from it for their part of fun, frolic and happiness is over. Those on the car, right next to the car from which passengers are alighting look up excitedly for they still have one full circle to go before they are to get down, and those like us on the other side of the circle on the top of it, do not really know what to feel of. We are connected to the people at the bottom of the circle who are getting down and remember the fun, fear and happiness through which those getting down were our partners. We are on the top of it, and look with gloom to the people getting down right now and to the people in the car right before the car which is getting vacant with sadness, so poignant that we do not look at the faces of other co-passengers in our cars.

We do not look at them because we do not want them to know us in our moments of weakness and at times, because in the view of ephemeral nature of life thus being exposed to us, we are ashamed of each other for the moments when we were petty to one another and took secret pleasure in firing shots of explicit and at times, subtle insult and insinuation. We did all that to prove to be taller than those around us, even to those that we loved, even when we knew that the feigned stature, as we built inches over our heights will not stand the strong winds of time as our car descended down to the disembarkment point. We look around from the vantage point that we have and look about and look down at the world that we see. We look at forgiveness as a sign of weakness, and the stature gained out of sheer stroke of good fortune as a boot given by nature to crush those who had been less fortunate. Those who are right now at the beginning of the circle, look up to us and learn all the crookedness from us and will come to realise the senselessness of all they have learnt only at the time when they are no longer in the position of benefiting from the new learning which comes too late in the life. 
It is so very imperative to learn when you have at least half the circle to go, how significant it is to learn early in life few things

- to Forgive, without wanting to correct those around you. Isn't it the violet that leaves fragrance on the very feet that crushes it?

- Letting go. Let go yourself from the bondage that your own ideas of right principles put on you and that you put on others by virtue of those same principles of righteousness. Life is but fleeting to be bound by ideas of pleasing people. You are there to be happy, rather to be ecstatic, without wanting to please anyone. As long as your happiness is drawn from your own being and strength, no outdated principles should constrain you. You are your own arbiter and the judge.

- You must not look for happiness outside, nor should your happiness be determined by others. Learn it and make it known to those around you, thereby, transforming the chains of love that you put on them into garlands.

- Do random acts of kindness. It will not affect your affluence if you are affluent and it will not affect your poverty if you are poor. Do not be embarrassed to be kind and gentle even when it looks out of time today. Kindness will not go out of fashion and while doing it always remind yourself, it is not for the good of the recipient that you are doing it, it for your own good you are doing it. Make it random, not a forced act bound by general perception of what is good. Do it because you want to feel alive and good and of course, ecstatic.

- Admire your kids for they are the ones who will be there much after you are gone, but remember, they are the forebear of the light of evolution which has to go way beyond the point where your car will touch the zenith of the big circle of life and you get down of it. They have to be different and be more than what you are.Set them high examples but remember they will find there own ways to reach there and without doubt they will go beyond the marks that you set for them. Offer them the earth to which they can come back and breathe for a while in moments of confusions and self-doubt, but remember, they will discover they will invent their own skies to fly forth to. What they do might be confounding to you at times, but then trust your teachings, and believe that they may have chosen something new, something different, but will not stray from what is the essence of virtue, that is, kindness and honesty. Believe in their goodness and resolve to love them, even when you can find love to be the most unreasonable emotion. Love them without reason and let love not be a coveted academy in which they need to clear a test every time they want to enter. Find happiness in their being and be so that they find happiness in your being.

I hope, I can remember all that I write here every moment of my life, as my car begins descent. I look at those weary souls which get down from the car down beneath, sigh with pain of separation and look at the pink, bald beauty resting on my arms, deep in the sleep and feel that eternity smiles at me, like a gentle breeze after the first rain of the season with the smell of earth contained in it. Nietzsche says about dying on the right time, I do not know what right time is. What I set out to find is what is the right time to live, so I could start living before it is right time to die and further taking a leaf from the noted philosopher, I should be able to say at that moment, " Was that life, Once more." Cry no more, learn early from those who went before you, so you have more time to dance and be happy, about what? about being alive and about being able to look at life growing in your own courtyard.

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