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The Difficulty of Being Educated in India

Julie & Julia PosterI have not written from quite some time, and am again sitting on the laptop to collate, converge and lay out for my thoughts for all to see, in part motivated by the wonderfully made movie "Julie and Julia"about a woman blogger who finds the meaning of life in a blog on cooking following the footsteps of Julia Child (Played by Meryl Streep), an absolutely adorable Amy Adams and a charmingly punctuated and beautiful Meryl Streep, and in part, the relaxing comfort and away from squalor, in wonderful hospitality of Taj West End in Bangalore.
I for one, mostly going throught the job of getting through the admissions without much ado in relatively tranquil and quaint pace of small, tier 2 towns, was always amused and more often than not distressed looking at overly indulgent parents flocking the school gates, arrogantly parking large cars in colony streets, taking leaves to help kids in exams. However, from the arcadia of high morals, I had to step down into the squalor of common mortals this winter as I like any other hapless parent, ran around school to school submitting admission forms in no less than two scores of schools, without any clue about the basis on which schools were rated an all. Now come to think of it, I have studies in all sort of schools, mostly studies on my own and did not eventually ended up with life in drains. I do always believe the great role destiny plays in a man's life, which can make best laid plans go awry, and which eventually means that there is not much point in a man laboring meticulously except to keep him busy with something which is not detrimental to him or the society around him and with this view, why would it matter where you eventually study. But that was yesterday, when those toy-like arms were not encircling me every evening as I went back from work and when those blue, tranquil yet naughty eyes (I have no clue how she manages to have both simultaneously) were not to look at me in the dark of night from under the blanket. Being in love, makes one loose all sense of proportion, all degree of reasonableness. So there I was, preparedly waiting for school results, which came one after another, disappointingly pressing home the inadequacy of a father in delhi, who is either not connected well enough or is not able to figure out how to use those connection, as Minister for education smiled from bill-boards proclaiming Right to Education. Finally, for once, possibly for the first time, lady luck smiled during the draw in St. Paul, second lady to smile at me in a tediously very, very long time. And then came St. Mary, with all its ducks and hens, eventually ducks won and now Nonu will be going to St. Mary, I will be more disciplined, take care of health, it can not be taken for granted any more, I do not know something might be killing me softly inside at this very moment. Times are not easy, how can I let her alone. Not yet my child, walk with me a little more while.

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