Skip to main content

Trust..What is that Word?


I work in Sales, not the kind where you can go on a call and then go home and sleep, but the kind where you can very well go home and sleep, but on every dreadful Tuesday, mirrors are out and you have to ensure that what you find in the mirror is something likeable, it might not be successful, but it has to be honest, and true to commitment.

How can you do that when there are so many human  factors internally and externally which define how true you will come out to be? The only way is to have people who can make a difference and who are intending to be as trustworthy and true to their commitments as you are, right across the value chain, or food chain or whatever you might decide to call it. And don't be fooled by appearances which are nothing but that.

There a very sad thing about language, what started as a way to communicate what you have in your mind and heart is the same thing which is used to hide what you have in your mind and heart. When you hear the word,"Trust me" first thing you want to do is run. You are let down is not the big thing, what is bigger is the cascade which follows, as you are, in the chain, not a victim, but the perpetrator, the harbinger of bad news. It kills a part of you which wants to be friend, it pushes you to a height where depth is impossible, and eventually it pushes you so high that even breathing is impossible. This is one thing which one can not avoid, it is the peril of staying alive and staying with people. Nietzsche forewarned when he said, Flee to your solitude, but can you really. How many people have the talent and genius to survive on a solitary profession, like writing, painting or even running. Even those are getting so less solitary as time passes by, but still they do have a sense of autonomy, since they are very individualistic enterprise. These are moments of disbelief, when even your belief in your own self is shaken, and you feel something cracking in the backbone of your existence.
I have to get up, brush my clothes of the dust, pick the smile which fell in one corner and put it where it was, and be ready to answer your lie with a lie. I can not resist being honest, I will return what I get, measure for measure, sometime more.
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Book Review- The Waves- By Virginia Woolf

Book: The Waves Author: Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) Genre: Fiction (Spiritual/ Philosophical) Style: Experimental Published: 1931 Publisher: Hogarth Press Rating: Must Read, Classic
“The Author would be glad if the following pages were not read as a Novel.” – WroteVirginia Woolf(1882-1941) on the manuscript of The Waves (Initially called The Moths). It was first published in 1931.  We are close to a century since this book was published, still this book is unparalleled and unequaled. The Independent called this Book of a Lifetime.
This is not an easy book to read. Beauty is never too easy to create, or is it ever too easy to savor to the fullest. Both production as well as the consumption of true work of art needs to be earned. This is a difficult book to read yet immensely elegant and infinitely exquisite. The story, unlike most fictional novels, does not unfold through dramatic events. It doesn’t depend on drama, it deftly steers clear of the mundane. It is sensually sublime and magnificentl…

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man- James Joyce- Book Review

Amazon Link 
Some books are an act of education; they cannot be read in haste, cannot be understood in one read. James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man gives one such feeling.
It is a coming of age story of Stephen Dedalus. Nothing extraordinary about that. But then there a rich, slowly flowing lost river of philosophy which moves beneath the surface, turning an ordinary story of a boy growing up, encountering questions about faith, religion and sex, into an exceptional, extraordinary and engaging story. The story moves along the timeline, much in the manner of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, where the writer is seemingly a passive narrator. Further, while this book is more of a philosophical essay wrapped around a story, Ms. Woolf’s book, on the other hand, is rather a Story primarily, with a philosophical touch. This book is blatantly philosophical, dwelling into the dangerous territory of religion and how a growing mind looks at God. It begins with his school, whe…

Madam Bovary's Eyes- Flaubert's Parrot - Book Review

Some books are very hard to classify and categorize. This is one such book. Officially, it is a fiction, a novel. In terms of genre, it should be put in the same shelf as Cakes and Ale by Maugham or The Ghost Writer of Philip Roth, both I have read this year. But then, maybe not. The two are totally fictional, in terms of all the characters contained in them, even though they do have a writer as the central character. But then, that is all that has to do with writing. I don’t think we ever consider the writer’s profession as a central point of those novels. Also the characters are out and out fiction. That is where this book is different. It is about the giant of French literary history (and now, of English classical literature)- Gustave Flaubert.
            The characters and references are all real. Julian Barnes throws all his weight behind the genius who is the key protagonist in the fiction, follows the dictum of a perfect biography as mentioned by Flaubert in a letter in 1872, …