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Words- a Case for Literature

I had, as would many, many a friends connected on the social media. Though not unknown, I have not come around to appreciate many of them, who probably read my words in silence, occasionally leave a like on my pictures. It rained a night before, right in the middle if the last leg if a trying winter. I heard the rain tip toeing in my roof and remembered a blissful, albeit lonely childhood and posted the same on the Facebook.

Possibly reminded of their own childhood, many friends liked it. Well, who as a child has not felt the felicity dance through the rain tapping on the roof, not smelt the sand smiling at the water falling on it and not watched the rain drops, moving along the iron window frames before bulking up and dropping down, with a sense of admiration and charm.

Well, lot many people liked what I posted, some said the words I wrote, they loved. One message which stuck was from a young girl, a cousin of mine. She was connected for long, but seemed for the first time, we conversed. She loved the words and I loved her admiration.

As some sort of surprise, had accidental brush with a marvel if Freud, " The first time a man decided to hurl an insult in stead of a stone, that was he beginning of civilisation." Of late have been quite concerned about the general degradation of social moral benchmark and I always felt that the solution proposed by many agitated souls on the social media revolved around fear. I felt that was a fault inherent in the proposition. You can't scare people to be civil, not everywhere, not everyone, not always.

The civility of behaviour has to come from within, and as Freud said, had to begin with words. We turn violent when we lose a sense of word. I am not very clear what killed the word, whether it is the effortless visual representation brought about by the visual communication on today's populace through television or an erroneous thought which believes literature to be in contradiction to the principles of survival.

We have evolved into a society where literature and love of it is frowned at. It is not very uncommon to find young people boasting that they have never finished a book , unless, of course, if it were a part of course curriculum. Somehow, we are made to believe it is linked to a practical, down to earth persona. There seem to be a certain sense of false pride associated with non reading.

We find violence around us and fail to realise that it is emanating from our lack of understanding of the world around us and lack of appreciation of life around us. More often than not we find people who study literature today in colleges are kids who did not make it anywhere else. They did not chose literature, but where thrown in the garbage of words, so they think.

Little do we realise that literature is the greatest enabler which placed the most feeble of all animals to close to the highest rung in the Darwin's ladder of survival of the fittest. When we lose words, we lose the capacity to understand the world around us. Without words, we not only lose the comprehension, we also lose the greatest tool to handle the adverse, and are left with only two tools to manage adversity, violence or surrender. All violence is a conspiracy against dictionary.

When we articulate, we explain ourselves and understand the world. What we don't understand, we either detest or fear. I posit, if we could bring back the love of literature among the young, and equip them to understand the life better, we should be able to resolve a lot of troubles of the world, for those still persisting other ways can work unburdened.

PS. This post is to two young people, my nephew, Sonam, a car racing aficionado, who took to reading and writing post the time he spent with me, and Puja, who I believe, will grow into a wonderful lady, if she could pursue the path of literature, which I believe she has innocently embarked on.

Comments

vinay shrivastava said…
The civility of behaviour has to come from within, induced from your writings, often and more.
saket suryesh said…
I agree. How many times we look at crimes and violence around and, in disgust ask ourselves, what was he/ she/ they thinking? The problem is that thinking in such cases, such acts are devoid of sense of justice, right or wrong. Without words, we can not think. There are rarities which will lurk in dark alleys, and can be dealt with by action but with cultivating a love for reading, we can avoid a great deal of nonsense from life. As usual, your comments are great inducer for great writing, something like Socratic dialog style, which we were Greeks, thinking for a living..

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