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About Death



The harrowing face of death
A vacuous grief,
Peeking from behind the shoulder,
Watching through gray evenings
And dark, unending nights
Slimy and serpentine,
Slowly slithering across the street
Waiting for a faltering step,
A heavy knot rising thought the chest,
A broken soul, a weakened will,
A shivering shadow of a fading love.
Death has many faces
Death, the faceless demon,
The vampirish monkey lurking in the dark
Ready to pounce
At tired, unloved soul,
Hungrily waiting for the moment
When dust meets dust and
Returns ashes to ashes.
I laugh in hoarse voice,
Face heavenwards,
Mocking death, proclaim,
For I will live forever,
In love, in thoughts,
In solemn, poignant moments of longing,
In lingering laughter
In pulsating ideas,
In tears unshed,
Which will live forever,
A feeble breeze of my soul
Contributing to the 
thundering storm of eternity.

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